coffee bag basket

rainbow basket

Rainbow coffee bags have become so different model squares while creating content for this website that I already had enough for a large basket. I turned some of the red squares at the top and bottom of the bags into corner pieces. One red square remained for the bottom of the basket. The remaining 13 squares are all different.

The squares and corners are connected in the usual way with a gift string. The bottom looks like every other square is red and every other is patterned.

The upper edge of the basket was finished with string. The pattern of the basket became quite mixed, but still works well for storing goods in a closet, for example.

Kolme pientä eri mallista kahvipussikoria Juhla Mokka pusseista punottuna

small red baskets

Pienten Juhla Mokka kahvipussikorien kappaleet.

Of the previous Juhla Mokka bags, there were all the top edges of the coffee bags left. Some of the remaining pieces were enough for 6,8 cm strips, but the torn bags I had to cut strips 5,1 cm wide and weaved 6×8 and 8×8 squares and corner pieces.

In addition to the left over pieces, I cut strips from Juhla Mokka 100 g serving bags, of which I weaved 6×6 rectangular squares. This basket is based on a 6×6 square woven from Juhla Mokka bags. The sides consist of horizontal strips of 5 cm wide three-fold folded and vertical strips of 6,8 cm wide three-fold folded from the smaller sachets.

Juhla Mokka kahvipusseista ja pienemmistä annospusseista koria varten punotut ruudut.
Kolme pientä eri mallista kahvipussikoria Juhla Mokka pusseista punottuna

The end result is a high basket combined of two two-cornered pieces to store pens, for example. The second basket is long and narrow and stacked from two identical two-corner pieces and two 6×8 squares. The third basket is a combination of large and small Juhla Mokka bags slightly lower than a cube basket.

zig zag weaving and square weaving in one basket

This coffee bag basket is combined with square weaving and zig zag weaving. The basket is the same size as the basket of two corner pieces and two triangles. The only difference is the turning of the edge, which makes the edge thicker and because of this a few more strips go into the basket as well. 12 strips went to the bottom of this basket and 24 to the edges.

The bottom of the basket is a plain woven square, the corners of which are also visible on the sides of the basket. The rest of the sides of the basket are formed by zig zag weaving.

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The parts of the basket are connected by a gift string, which has also been used to turn the corners of the edge. You can watch the full tutorial of the basket in the video:

The size of the finished basket is approx. 10,5 x 10,5 x 10,5 cm and it is perfect for storing small items, for example in a bathroom mirror cabinet.

basket made from small coffee bags with windmill weaving

Juhla Mokka serving bags are smaller in width and are well suited for windmill weaving. These bags with golden tops are from 2004-2006. The width of the bags is 12 cm.

In windmill weaving, there are four strips for one width of the coffee bag, which means that the strip to be cut according to the calculation formula in the lower picture is 8,5 cm wide. The folded strip is about 2,9 cm wide. Some of the bags had been cut open a little lower, making the top edges uneven. However, this does not hurt, as long as the uneven strip width is taken into account in the folding.

Folding these narrower bags is a bit challenging, but looking at the patterns on the bag, the fold lines are easy to define fairly accurately. In these strips, the pattern is determined by the fact that the upper edge of the strip is cut from the upper edge of the “paahtoastemittari” mark on the back of the bag.

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The strips are woven so that in one windmill all strips have the same end of the strip. This is, of course, impossible in forming the corners, but the windmills containing the different ends of the strips are hidden at the bottom of the basket.

In the video you can see the weaving of the basket. The size of the finished basket is about 21 x 20 x 28 cm and 115 coffee bags went into this basket.

zigzag woven coffee bag basket

Zigzag weaving works in many respects in the same way as square weaving. The strip width is calculated in the same way and the pattern design can be done in the same way. The weavingis starts in the same way, but after half a square the direction is reversed and the weavingis continues to form a zigzag shape. The woven pieces are also joined like squares by sewing from the hinges. The zigzag queue can also be combined with turns, in which case the weaving direction is turned twice in the same direction. The picture below shows an example of changing direction. A change of direction is needed in building the base of the basket.

The sides of the basket or bag are formed of solid zigzag rings. Three of those rings are woven for this basket.

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The innermost layer of the bottom of the basket is woven from 24 strips, the outermost layer from 72 strips and there are 84 strips in each edge layer. So a total of 348 strips. The width of the coffee bag is 14,8 cm and the width of the strip is 6,8 cm. In the video you can see the whole steps of weaving the basket:

The size of the basket is about 31 x 31 x 41 cm. A lower or higher basket can be obtained by reducing or adding the edge layers.

colorful coffee bag basket

The previous Paulig city coffee project left me a lot of material and resulted in a multicolored combination of text and patterned strips. I ended up weaving an elongated basket out of them that fits even in a bathroom mirror cabinet that the deeper baskets don’t fit.

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The strips were cut into this basket just from the top of the bags side by side, and the layout takes into account that the Paulig logos and barcodes on the back of the bag do not appear outside the basket. The basket consists of three triangles, two corner pieces and one square. The size of the basket is approx. 10,5 x 21 x 10,5 cm. You can watch the construction of the basket in the video:

juhla mokka coffee bag basket with tilted square design

After several baskets and bags of white and black Juhla Mokka, there was quite a lot left overs from the coffee bags. From the lower parts of these bags, I created a low storage basket for my hat shelf, where the hats and gloves are easily buried behind other stuff and it is difficult to find what I’m looking for.

The strip width of these Juhla Mokka bags is 5,4 cm, which when folded is 1,8 cm. The patterns are arranged as a windmill pattern.

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In this weaving technique, the arrangement of the patterns is easy when the squares are not sewn, which makes the strips easily move to the wrong position a couple of millimetres.

Small holes are formed in the basket, but it doesn’t matter with the storage of mittens and hats. It may be a good idea to get some ventilation after use.

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There were 242 strips in this basket. The number of strips can be calculated from the number of squares in the basket, plus the number of strips folded on the upper edge:

56 (squares) x 4 strips + 18 (edge squares) x 1 strip = 242 strips

Four strips could have been cut from one intact coffee package. That is, if weaving a particular pattern is not of interest or monochrome coffee packages are used, then 61 intact coffee packages should suffice for this basket. The dimensions of the finished basket are approx. 17 x 32 x 39 cm.

colorful coffee bag basket

Paulig’s city coffees have recently a new flavor and there are now seven different colored coffee bags. For these, I can see which flavors are most popular among coffee bag collectors, with orange Barcelona and turquoise Havana bags being the least common. And of course the latest green Singapore which I only had one for this project.

Of all the city coffee bags, I used only the monochrome parts of the top edges for this basket, from which I got to weave the colorful checkered squares. I avoided adjacent squares of the same color by weaving strips of the same color in one square in the same direction. For example, in the top square of the following image, yellow, blue, and an orange stripe are woven in one direction and light blue, pink, and turquoise in the other direction.

When the squares were joined, adjacent parts of the same color appeared at the seams, but this resulted in fewer and smaller monochromatic areas than the intersecting strips woven into the squares. I also laid out the squares in the basket a little differently than usual because I wanted the colors on the sides not to form a regular coloring. In the previous image, you can see how the orange and turquoise strips form every other small square on the same line.

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The squares are first joined together side by side and into a ring shape that forms the sides of the basket. Finally, the base is attached to the rim of the basket. A 1 cm wide gift string has been used for connecting the squares. The upper edge of the basket was left unfinished, because in light use the edge does not unravel easily.

Ketjukuvioinen Juhla Mokka kahvipussikori.

experimenting with corner pieces

Ketjukuvioiset kappaleet ketjukuvioista koria varten.

There have been so many samples of square weaving in this website project that I wanted to make baskets for storage that are easy to browse. Baskets with the height of a half-square can be woven using corner pieces, and in addition, traditional squares have been used here to make the basket elongated and to hold more squares in it. Juhla Mokka was chosen as the material for the baskets, because I have already made enough bags from it. The first basket was made of chain-patterned Juhla Mokka squares.

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The corner pieces are connected in the same way as the squares. In this basket, the hinges are only in the middle of the flat surfaces of the basket and it is easier to cover them. The corners also become smoother when they have no knots or other seams on them. The chain pattern continues nicely around the entire basket and the basket is solid red on the inside and bottom.

Ketjukuvioinen Juhla Mokka kahvipussikori.
Juhla Mokka kahvipusseista valmistettuja ruutuja ja kulmia korin valmistamista varten.

The second basket came with 8×8 corner pieces and 6×8 squares in the middle. Juhla Mokka bags always leave much narrower strips from the bottom and the top parts of the bags due to the tearing of the edges, so now I was able to use them as well.

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The different widths look nice in the basket, but don’t stand out too much. There are also different shades of red in the basket, because the strips are cut from Juhla Mokka bags in different places and the same strip may already have different shades.

Juhla Mokka kahvipusseista valmistettu matala pitkulainen kori.
Punottuja ruutuja ruutupunonnalla valmistetuissa koreissa.

One basket can hold about 40 squares and the examples of the coffee bags that have been used for the weaving.

large white and black coffee bag basket

These older Juhla Mokka coffee bags are one of my all time favorite, because of the alignment of the white parts of the logos on the bag. In the newer Juhla Mokka bags the logos are not aligned with each other, so it is impossible to weave this type of white and black design. There are 156 strips in the basket that have been cut one/coffee bag. The rest of the coffee bag material is enough for couple of other projects.

This basket consists of nine squares, five triangles and two corner pieces. You can see how the weaving technique of the triangle effects on the design the way that not all the parts of the triangle are white based. Luckily only one little triangle is showing red on each woven triangle so it doesn’t effect the whole design that much.

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The pieces are joined wit 1 cm wide gift string. See the whole making of the basket on the video below:

As you can see there are few red parts on the edge of the basket, but it is quite unnoticeable, because the inside of the basket is the same color.