Juhla Mokka bags

combination of different size bags

Square weaving can be used not only for squares but also for weaving other rectangles. In square weaving, the length of the side of the woven square is determined by the width of the material used (in coffee bag weaving, the coffee bag). If two bags of different widths are combined in the same square, then the width and height of the square will be of different dimensions. In this project, you can see how two different bags can be combined in the same basket.

The basket consists of two squares and three other rectangles. Juhla Mokka 500 g and 100 g coffee bags from 2004 have been used as material. The width of the larger one is a good 15 cm and the smaller one is about 12 cm. The width of the strips to be cut is determined by folding the paper, and the same instruction applies to most coffee bags of different widths. However, you must always take into account the number of strips to be woven, the width and hardness of the material used, and your own folding style (with smaller folds, the strips remain wider). The basket took 6×3=18 large coffee bags and 8×3+12×2=48 small bags. The strips have been cut 1/bag, but you can of course get more strips from one coffee bag, if it fits your pattern plan.

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The size of the finished basket is approximately 12 x 12 x 15 cm.

coffee bag basket from two different coffee bags

Different patterns can be woven out of coffee bags, also by using different colored coffee bags mixed up. This basket uses the silver inner part of Presidentti coffee packets and the red textual part of Juhla Mokka bags.

The strips are woven so that there are always two of the same color next to each other.

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When connecting woven squares, the continuity of the pattern is taken into account on the sides of the basket, but the pattern does not continue perfectly on the bottom because of the corners. The basket consists of eight squares, and each square has six Presidentti coffee bag strips and six Juhla Mokka coffee bag strips. There are a total of 96 strips in the basket, half of which are silver and half red. The parts of the basket are connected with a 1 cm wide gift string and the gift string has also been used to finish the upper edge of the basket. The size of the finished basket is approximately 15x30x15 cm.

red coffee bag basket with tilted square design

The tops of the coffee bags left over from the weaving of the white and black Juhla Mokka basket have been used for this, which are the same color as the back of the package. The gold-colored front part therefore remains inside the basket.

A combination of square weaving and windmill weaving has been used to weave the basket, where the length of the side of the square is half the length of the coffee bag strip. The squares are woven side by side and the basket is formed during the weaving, which is why it is no longer necessary to sew the parts together at the end. Below is a picture of two adjacent squares and a video instruction for basket weaving.

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The height and width of this basket are three squares, and the depth is five squares. 268 strips went into this basket. The size of the basket is approx. 24x24x39 cm. The number of strips can be calculated from the number of squares in the basket, to which the number of strips folded to hide based on the length of the edge is added:

63 (squares) x 4 strips + 16 (edge squares) x 1 strip = 268 strips

basket from leftover coffee bag pieces

In coffee bag weaving, there are often plenty of coffee bag parts left over, if you are weaving patterns that fit only part of the coffee bag. This happens to me, especially with Juhla Mokka coffee bags. A golden coffee cup with a red base is not one of my favorites as a color combination, so the lower parts of the coffee bags often go unused.

Most of the bags and baskets I weave are in some way precisely designed in terms of patterns, but this one is mixed with strips cut from Juhla Mokka coffee bags without a special pattern plan. The basket is woven with a combination of square weaving and windmill weaving. The coffee bags are cut into 5,4 cm wide strips, which are folded into three-layered rings. In the following video you can see instructions for this weaving technique (the basket in the video is woven only from the upper parts of the Juhla Mokka bags and the size of the basket is slightly larger):

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The height of the basket is two squares (16,5 cm), width three squares (24 cm) and depth five squares (40 cm). In total, 204 strips were used to weave the basket, which, if cut from whole coffee packets, would be about 51 coffee packets.

coffee bag basket with zigzag design

Paulig’s Reykjavik and Juhla Mokka coffee packages are combined in this coffee bag basket. Juhla Mokka packages have strips cut from the bottom of the bag, where the back of the package has a monochrome red area. On the other hand, three strips of Reykjavik coffee packets have been randomly cut from each packet, the patterns of which have been arranged when weaving so that neither the white Paulig logo nor the red UTZ logo is visible from the top of the packet.

The width of the strips cut from the coffee packets is 6,8 cm and they are folded into three layers, so the width of the folded strip is 2,3 cm. There are 32 Reykjavik strips in one zigzag layer (11 coffee packets). There are the same 32 pieces of strips cut from Juhla Mokka packets in the zigzag layer and an additional 8 pieces in the bottom square, i.e. a total of 40 pieces (40 coffee packets).

In the video you can watch more detailed instructions for weaving and assembling the basket:

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The height of the finished basket is approx. 17,5 cm and the size of the base is 14 x 14 cm.

small basket with square ans zigzag weaving

This basket is a combination of square weaving (/square weaving) and one of the applications of zigzag weaving. The picture below shows the formation of the basket from strips cut from coffee bags. The square forms the bottom and part of the sides of the basket. The zigzag forms the rest of the sides of the basket. Folds are marked with a dashed line and the gray lines show the coffee bag strips.

The square base of the basket consists of 12 strips cut from the tops of Juhla Mokka packages. The zigzag consists of 24 black and white strips, which are from the logo of the old Juhla Mokka packages. So there are 36 strips in total. You can see the instructions for basket weaving in the video below.

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The height of the finished basket is 10,5 cm and the size of the base is 7×14 cm.

small red baskets

Pienten Juhla Mokka kahvipussikorien kappaleet.

Of the previous Juhla Mokka bags, there were all the top edges of the coffee bags left. Some of the remaining pieces were enough for 6,8 cm strips, but the torn bags I had to cut strips 5,1 cm wide and weaved 6×8 and 8×8 squares and corner pieces.

In addition to the left over pieces, I cut strips from Juhla Mokka 100 g serving bags, of which I weaved 6×6 rectangular squares. This basket is based on a 6×6 square woven from Juhla Mokka bags. The sides consist of horizontal strips of 5 cm wide three-fold folded and vertical strips of 6,8 cm wide three-fold folded from the smaller sachets.

Juhla Mokka kahvipusseista ja pienemmistä annospusseista koria varten punotut ruudut.
Kolme pientä eri mallista kahvipussikoria Juhla Mokka pusseista punottuna

The end result is a high basket combined of two two-cornered pieces to store pens, for example. The second basket is long and narrow and stacked from two identical two-corner pieces and two 6×8 squares. The third basket is a combination of large and small Juhla Mokka bags slightly lower than a cube basket.

juhla mokka bags

Again, so many old Juhla Mokka bags had accumulated in my stash that it was good time to weave a couple of Juhla Mokka bags again. The small cube baskets are well suited for storing coffee bags and all the 168 bags you need for the bags were packed on this one.

First, I cut black and white strips from the coffee bags. For the second strip, I wanted to try new patterns and cut them below the black and white strips. I braided the strips so that the center of the coffee cup remains visible and the coffee cups of the four strips form one cluster. This resulted in four different options, from which I chose the model in the upper right corner, where the foam in the coffee forms a light dot in the coffee cup pattern.

I also tried different patterns on the black and white strips, but it’s harder to see the differences from them, so I used all the different variations on the same bag.

I placed the coffee cup patterns on the bag so that they run as diagonal stripes on the sides of the bag. It was not possible to continue the stripes seamlessly at the bottom of the bag, but this way the patterns do not hit side by side and are always the most angular.

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I tested a different type of joining of squares in these bags. I usually connected the squares of the black and white bag from the hinges first and pulled the strips from the top of the square in front of the hinges. Here are pictures before and after joining from the same point. By comparing the same points on the strips, you can see how much the pattern moved when the squares were joined. An example is the point circled in yellow.

In the second bag, I sewed the hinges normally, after which I pulled the strip I wanted from the inside of the bag onto the hinge and pulled the space left under the square outside the bag on the hinge. This avoided spinning the strips in the finished bag, which is quite challenging.

I always finish the top of the bag with a string, which I tie and thread inside the bag into the first couple of strips. This makes it easy to remove the cord if you need to hang reflectors or other decorations on the edge of the bag, for example.

Lastly, I threaded the blue ribbon outside the bag and sew the ends of the ribbon.

basket made from small coffee bags with windmill weaving

Juhla Mokka serving bags are smaller in width and are well suited for windmill weaving. These bags with golden tops are from 2004-2006. The width of the bags is 12 cm.

In windmill weaving, there are four strips for one width of the coffee bag, which means that the strip to be cut according to the calculation formula in the lower picture is 8,5 cm wide. The folded strip is about 2,9 cm wide. Some of the bags had been cut open a little lower, making the top edges uneven. However, this does not hurt, as long as the uneven strip width is taken into account in the folding.

Folding these narrower bags is a bit challenging, but looking at the patterns on the bag, the fold lines are easy to define fairly accurately. In these strips, the pattern is determined by the fact that the upper edge of the strip is cut from the upper edge of the “paahtoastemittari” mark on the back of the bag.

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The strips are woven so that in one windmill all strips have the same end of the strip. This is, of course, impossible in forming the corners, but the windmills containing the different ends of the strips are hidden at the bottom of the basket.

In the video you can see the weaving of the basket. The size of the finished basket is about 21 x 20 x 28 cm and 115 coffee bags went into this basket.

black and white envelope purse

I decided to try a weave a small envelope from coffee bags and use the black and white Juhla Mokka squares waiting for it. An envelope needs one square, one triangle, and two corner pieces. There are six strips in one corner, so I got to convert one finished square into two corners.

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The challenge in weaving a triangle is to design the pattern as the strips are turned in the middle of the weaving. For Juhla Mokka bags, this will not work if the goal is a black and white triangle. There would be one red spot on the edge of the triangle. As a solution to this problem, coffee bag strips have been chosen instead, which are almost completely black and thus well suited for weaving a black triangle. After all, that triangle doesn’t show much under the flap of the envelope and brings even a nice detail as a black stripe to the edge of the flap.

The corner pieces from Juhla Mokka bags can be woven in black and white and two corners are needed for this envelope. The pieces are connected in the usual way with a gift string. The edge of the envelope flap is finished with black cord, which is also threaded through the long edge of the triangle. This prevents the edge from coming loose.

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A magnetic clip has been added to the flap to close the envelope. The half of the magnetic clip on the flap is attached through the innermost strip, so that the fastener is not visible outside the flap. Holes for magnets can be easily made with sharp-edged scissors, as long as they do not become too large.